Because You Ask

krugeBecause you ask, the answer is no. This is a friendly cousin of an old favorite, “Because, you wish it!” which I picked up from a happy-go-lucky Klingon Commander in the movie Star Trek III: The Search For Spock.

It’s a simple policy I find to be remarkably effective.

For a limited time, I’ll explain how it works.

Step 1: Find someone to ask you for something. This usually isn’t too hard.

Step 2: Say “no.” The phrase “Because, you wish it!” is optional but provides a certain undeniable flair.

If you can’t find someone to ask for something, try going grocery shopping. 99% of the time (or so I theorize) the amount of your purchase will contain a fractional amount of dollars. (I’m in cents about that.) That’s when the happy-go-lucky clerk will loudly ask, for all to hear:

You’re not such a selfish sack of shit that you’re unwilling to “round up” for charity, are you? Huh, huh, huh? Greedo! I must be Han Solo because I’m firing first. I dare you to say no. It’s for “charity” and that’s always good, right? Am I right or am I right?

Listen, fuck face. I’m doing you a courtesy by shopping in your establishment. And you respond to that by trying to guilt me into some action that will ultimately make you look good?

roundupI decided the best course of action is to carry an actual bottle of Roundup® Weed Killer on my belt. (Who says Monsanto can’t be handy?) When some snot nose practitioner of psychological warfare asks me if I want to “round up” I’ll happily reply, “Don’t mind if I do!” and spray that shit right in their face.

Human acute toxicity is dose related. Acute fatal toxicity has been reported in deliberate overdose. Epidemiological studies have not found associations between long term low level exposure to glyphosate and any disease.

Based on an assessment completed in 1993 and published as a Reregistration Eligibility Decision (RED) document, the EPA considers glyphosate to be noncarcinogenic and relatively low in dermal and oral acute toxicity. The EPA considered a “worst case” dietary risk model of an individual eating a lifetime of food derived entirely from glyphosate-sprayed fields with residues at their maximum levels. This model indicated that no adverse health effects would be expected under such conditions.

In June 2013, the Medical Laboratory in Bremen published a report that glyphosate was present in human urine samples from 18 European countries. Malta showed the highest test results with the chemical showing up in 90% of samples and the average for all countries was 43.9%. Diet was stated as the main source.

Thanks for the assist, Wikipedia! 🙂

It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it. “Won’t you round up that wee bit for charity?” That sounds a lot nicer than the reality: “Gimme some arbitrary amount of your cash for our cause that you know nothing about. Our admin costs are only 98%. Ha ha ha!”

Or, worse: “We’ll use this money to fight against you, your core beliefs, and every cultural warfare front on which you stand opposed.” On second thought, maybe I shouldn’t be shopping at Chick-Fil-A and/or the Boy Scouts after all.

What’s wrong with asking for a little charity? Mainly that it makes it your decision and not mine. What could possibly be wrong with that? Only that I have absolutely no idea what my money will be used to support. Duh.

Recently a dude came to my door and asked for marriage equality support. That’s one of my pet causes. I gladly told him we already signed the petition when we enjoyed a “free” concert in the park. (Ha!) He said, “That’s great. I also need $60.”

“I don’t know who the hell you are.” Worse, the dude was a paid canvasser. Bothering me in my own home was his job. Somehow that rubs me the wrong way. It’s feels like spraying Monsanto on those alleged grass roots.

Long story short, me and the dude had a 45-minute conversation on my front porch and we connected. I ended up violating my own rule and giving him the oddly specific amount of $60. It didn’t hurt that this was a cause I believe in. What can guru say? Guru is often too nice.

A few weeks later, though, come to find out there are two different groups operating in the state, ostensibly for the same overall goal, but employing differing and contradictory strategies. Holy crap. Which group did I agree with? Which strategy did I end up “voting” for with my money? Did I agree with it? Or was I on the wrong side?

This is why giving to charity should be an outgoing decision, never incoming. Ever. To choose to do so is akin to voluntarily flushing your money down a toilet. Or worse.

So sell me my groceries and shut the hell up. I got hit by enough beggars just by walking into your store. That should have been my first clue, I guess.

4 responses

  1. Agreed. The donor picks the cause and the amount.

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    1. I filled out that form. Type: Organs. Amount: All. Still, it’s hardly like I if the cause will be worthy.

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  2. You so often don’t get to make a choice on which charity gets your cash. They make you google hard for the money. So hard for it, honey. So they better treat you right.

    Or send ’em to me and I’ll beat them into submission. *grin*

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    1. Trying to get the money before you know if the organization is worthy almost feels like an insult. I don’t mind supporting a good cause, but as the one doing the supporting (and not the taking) if feel it is my right to do all the research I want.

      Just last night on the local news they did a bit on charity fraud. This is a real thing.

      Worse, there can be massive abuse in the “legitimate” charity sphere. Even something like United Way that had a president accused of lavishness.

      “However, there were revelations of expense charges that raised some eyebrows: significant limousine expenses, international airfare for himself and guests, personal gifts and luxury items, travelling on the charity’s dime for personal reasons, loans and diversions of funds to companies that are owned by family members, a $4 million “golden parachute, etc.

      Clearly, Aramony was milking the organization, and he was eventually convicted of defrauding the organization of $1 million. He spent a few years in prison for this, but ironically, a federal judge later compelled the organization to pay out over $2 million in retirement benefits.”

      So yeah, I take it as an insult when those doing the asking are unwilling to give me the time to think it over.

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